Archive for January, 2010

Ok, I am FINALLY posting some photographs from New Zealand! There are sooo many to post, so I’ll be splitting them into a few different blog posts in the coming week. After Nicola and Kent’s beautiful wedding at Hunua Falls just south of Auckland, I decided to take an extra week and a half to visit my brother, Grant, who is currently living in Wanaka, New Zealand on the south island. It was an amazing trip that I will never forget and there was no way I could capture the dramatic landscapes down there as amazing as they are in person, but I hope I was close :)

I flew into Queenstown, which is about an hour south of Wanaka, and a few people at the wedding told me I had to catch a rugby match while I was there. So we went straigh to the pitch from the airport!

new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

After a few cold and rainy days in Wanaka, we were finally able to get out of town and head to the West Coast as our first of many day trips. We went with a few of Grant’s local friends who knew of several unknown spots along the way. My Utah friends will appreciate this little hike, what does this remind you of?
new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

The water was extremely cold, and as you will see in other posts as well, my brother finds it necessary to dive in no matter what the temperature is…
new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

Yea, it was cold, wasn’t it?!
new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

So many beautiful views of the river along the way…
new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

This is what I found incredible about New Zealand landscapes, you can find yourself deep in the mountains one minute, then the next, well, see for yourself…
new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

The West Coast is known for their fresh green mussels, so we decided to find out for ourselves…
new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

The fresh catch…
new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

Gathering the mussels to head back to Wanaka and cook them up…
new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

More photos coming soon!
Contact Me!
Wedding Portfolio

Just a quick preview of Nicola and Kent’s beautiful wedding at Hunua Falls just outside of Auckland, New Zealand. WOW is all I can say about this wedding…

new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

Contact Me!
Wedding Portfolio

I just wanted to post a quick update from across the globe in Auckland, New Zealand. Just before I left I photographed the wedding of Ellen and Jamie in Seattle, Washington, and even though I’m way over here, I had to post a little preview :)

Of course I also added a few snaps from downtown Auckland. So much more to come, so keep checking back!!

seattle wedding photographer-new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

seattle wedding photographer-new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

Here’s a few shots in Auckland…
seattle wedding photographer-new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

seattle wedding photographer-new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

seattle wedding photographer-new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

Had to stop for some coffee, so why not get it from a cafe named after the greatest coffee city in the world?…Seattle!!
seattle wedding photographer-new zealand wedding photographer-auckland wedding photographer-los angeles wedding photographer

Contact Me!
Wedding Portfolio

What Equipment Is Needed to Start a Photography Business

When you’re starting your own photography business, you will want to make sure you have the right equipment. Getting a sponsor or advertising your work is also very important. A business license, a marketing plan and a full calendar of waiting clients won’t help you at all if you don’t have the tools you need to take exceptional photos. In order to search and get any of the following products, make sure to use the WordTree Amazon Keyword Tool to get the best products and sales. You can also use this site for marketing and advertising your work. You will be allowed to monitor you niche as well, which is important. Get going and watch your search traffic and sales grow! We have different automated drip marketing campaigns that will help you get a higher lead management.

A Camera, Certainly

To be a pro photographer, you obviously need a camera. However, which camera you choose depends on what kind of photography you are taking and your budget. As a general rule, the more money you spend on a camera, the better quality it is, and for people that doesn’t have the cash there are other options like the top credit cards by The Motley Fool that allow them to get credit at a low rate.

DSLRs, or digital single lens reflex cameras, come in a variety of prices, and the pro models are always much more expensive. This is almost always due to the sensor – an expensive piece of technology that takes in the light from the lens. Professional cameras usually have full-frame sensors, while less expensive models have cropped sensors. Full-frame sensors are much better in low-light conditions, can capture more subtle variations in color than a cropped sensor can and work better with wide-angle lenses.

Mirrorless cameras have a variety of sensors as well and are becoming more popular with pro photographers who need to travel light, including travel photographers and wedding photographers. Because they don’t have a mirror, these models are thinner and lighter than their DSLR cousins. However, even the best models won’t always give you the same quality as a professional DSLR.

Lenses

High-quality lenses are essential for a pro photographer. As with cameras, price usually dictates the quality. If your plan is to be a wildlife or sports photographer, you will need to invest in a good telephoto lens and monopod, which will often cost more than the camera itself.

If you’re just starting out as a portrait or wedding photographer, it’s probably better to invest in a couple high-quality lenses and then get additional lenses as you start to bring in an income. For event photography, start with a couple of zoom lenses. For portraits, start with a zoom lens and a prime lens – which has no zoom ability. For commercial photography of products and other items in a studio, you may also want to invest in a macro lens first, which gives you close-ups of small items, like rings and jewelry. Here are some lenses to consider:

  • 70–200 mm f/2.8 zoom lens
  • 24–70 mm f/2.8 zoom lens
  • 85 mm prime lens
  • 35 mm prime lens
  • 100 mm or 60 mm macro lens

Accessories

For most pro photographers, the most important accessory will be your tripod. You want a stable tripod that won’t vibrate in the wind, especially if you are taking long-exposure shots. If you are working in a studio, you want at least two good lights and a few reflectors, as well as a couple stools, backdrops and props – like toys for children to hold in their portraits. Anyone taking portraits outdoors, including wedding photographers, will want a sunblock and a reflector, to reduce sunlight and to reflect sunlight on your models as needed – though in a pinch a couple large pieces of white foam board will do. For long-exposure shots, get a remote shutter control, either wired or wireless, so you won’t jostle the camera by pressing the shutter button.

Additionally, you should consider investing in the following:

  • durable camera bag
  • plenty of memory cards
  • lens cleaning kit
  • back up camera(s) for when your main camera fails
  • portable light kit for indoor shots, such as real estate listing photos
  • light meter for ensuring you have the correct exposure and aperture settings

Photo Processing Software

The difference between a decent photo and a spectacular photo more often than not comes down to what you do with it on your computer. Although your camera and your computer may come with free image processing software, and though there are less expensive options on the market, the standard is still Adobe’s products, Lightroom and Photoshop. Lightroom is used for batch processing, cataloging and organizing scores of images, and Photoshop lets you process images taken in RAW mode to get the best color and lighting from every single pixel, plus additional editing abilities. Many photographers begin with the less expensive software and then upgrade to Photoshop if they find they need additional features, such as removing objects from an image.

When Budget Is an Issue

Remember, the only difference between a pro photographer and an amateur is your ability to sell your pictures. More important than the equipment is your knack for taking memorable photos or clean catalog images.

If you don’t have thousands of dollars to invest in equipment, there is nothing wrong with starting out small. In fact, your phone probably has a better camera than what a good digital camera had to offer just 10 or 15 years ago. If you’re not taking low-light photos, there may be no reason to invest in a full-frame sensor yet. Get the best equipment you can afford. Keep an eye on Craigslist for people selling their old equipment when they are upgrading or look to where professionals trade in their used equipment. If you are looking to get a contract with a specific client or agency, ensure that your camera has the minimum megapixels or resolution your client requires.

Finally, outsource all of your printing needs – from 5-by-7 portraits to posters – to a local printing shop or a service available online. As you begin to make money and have the cameras and lenses you need, you may want to invest in your own printer, but there should be no rush for that when you’re just starting out.

Contact Me! 
Wedding Portfolio